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Chris Reeve Knives

A fully assembled Sebenza 21 Knife. Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
An assortment of pliers, wrenches, and clamps used in the Chris Reeve Knives workshop. Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
The present-day grinding area at Chris Reeve Knives in Boise, Idaho, which got its start 22 years ago in a one-car garage. Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
In knife-making, precision is achieved through sophisticated equipment, but also, fine attention to detail. Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Grinding belts used for hand-polishing, sharpening, and general finishing work hang at the ready. Several different grit belts are used in a specific sequence to achieve the desired finish. Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg
Crk26 160204 bmc chris reeve knives 1206 wuunsh
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Spring, 2016: Chris Reeve Knives

Chris Reeve Knives has been making ultra-high quality knives for over 30 years. In that time,
they have built a reputation for producing knives of the finest materials,
constructed to standards and tolerances that rival the aerospace industry.

Manufacturing tolerances dictate the range of acceptable deviation in the measurements
of a manufactured part to limits that won’t effect overall quality. The tightest tolerances set by Chris Reeve
in the knife manufacturing process is a tenth of a thousandth of an inch (0.0001). For example, if the target
measurement for a part is 1 inch, it’s final dimension may be between 1.0001 and 0.9999,
but anything outside of that range is not tolerated.

Photography by Jason Frank Rothenberg