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The Jigata Japanese Axe

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S45C steel, 0.45% carbon, and a scorched white oak handle.

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The Jigata Japanese Axe

Handcrafted in Japan exclusively for Best Made, this axe is a precision cutting tool, not designed for heavy torque or blunt striking; use with care, and it will deliver unparalleled speed and efficiency.

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$198
0

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Handcrafted in Japan exclusively for Best Made, this axe is a precision cutting tool, not designed for heavy torque or blunt striking; use with care, and it will deliver unparalleled speed and efficiency.

Story

Our spring 2015 trip to Sanjo marked the beginning of an illustrious relationship with some of the finest smiths in Japan. We worked directly with local legend Mizuno-san to offer a series of unique axes, each embodying a classic Japanese pattern, available exclusively to our customer. Mizuno-san has been awarded the title of Traditional Craftsman by the state; he and his three sons operate a workshop that is true to the techniques and styles of Japan’s smithing history, which is evident in the stunningly meticulous fit and finish of these axes. Heads are drop forged into patterns native to three regions in Japan, each having evolved for different uses and suited for regional varietals of wood. The traditional wedge fittings stand proud over the axe head, making for quick and easy adjustment in the field, and the Japanese white oak handles are scorched, which seals the exterior and protects the handles from rot, insects, and weather. This axe is a precision cutting tool, not designed for heavy torque or blunt striking; use with care, and they will deliver unparalleled speed and efficiency.

Specs
  • Drop-forged heads
  • HRC 53
  • Kurouchi oxidized surface finish
  • Hand-fit handles
  • Traditional wedge style
  • Axe length is 17.7"
Materials
  • S45C steel, 0.45% carbon
  • Scorched white oak
Origin
  • Made in Japan
In the Field

Sanjo, Japan. Spring 2015. Photo by Peter Buchanan-Smith.