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The Woodworker: The Charles Hayward Years: Vol. 1 - 4

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Volume 1: Tools

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Volume II: Techniques

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Volume III: Joinery

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Volume IV: The Shop & Furniture

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The Woodworker: The Charles Hayward Years: Vol. 1 - 4

There is little doubt that Charles H. Hayward (1898-1998) was the most important workshop writer and editor of the 20th century. As editor of The Woodworker magazine from 1939 to 1967, Hayward oversaw the transformation of the craft from one that was almost entirely hand-tool based to a time where machines were common, inexpensive and had displaced the handplanes, chisels and backsaws of Hayward’s training and youth.

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There is little doubt that Charles H. Hayward (1898-1998) was the most important workshop writer and editor of the 20th century. As editor of The Woodworker magazine from 1939 to 1967, Hayward oversaw the transformation of the craft from one that was almost entirely hand-tool based to a time where machines were common, inexpensive and had displaced the handplanes, chisels and backsaws of Hayward’s training and youth.

Story

There is little doubt that Charles H. Hayward (1898-1998) was the most important workshop writer and editor of the 20th century. Unlike any person before (and perhaps after) him, Hayward was a trained cabinetmaker and extraordinary illustrator, not to mention an excellent designer, writer, editor and photographer. As editor of The Woodworker magazine from 1939 to 1967, Hayward oversaw the transformation of the craft from one that was almost entirely hand-tool based to a time where machines were common, inexpensive and had displaced the handplanes, chisels and backsaws of Hayward’s training and youth. This massive project – offered in four volumes totaling 1,492 pages in all – seeks to reprint a small part of the information Hayward published in The Woodworker during his time as editor in chief. This is information that hasn’t been seen or read in decades. No matter where you are in the craft, from a complete novice to a professional, you will find information here you cannot get anywhere else.

Specs
  • Sold as a set of four
  • Publisher: Lost Art Press
  • Volume I: 456 pages
  • Volume II: 432 pages
  • Volume III: 168 pages
  • Volume IV: 336 pages
  • Black & white illustrations throughout
  • Acid-free paper
Origin
  • Printed in the USA
Notes

Volume I: Tools
The first volume covers, sharpening, setting out tools, chisels, planes, saws, boring tools, carving tools, turning, veneering and inlay.

Volume II: Techniques
The second volume covers hand-tool techniques, from making doors and drawers, mouldings, assemblies, panels and various kinds of legs.

Volume III: Joinery
This book covers all types of woodwork joints, including how to design them, cut them and fix them when things go awry.

Volume IV: The Shop & Furniture
Includes the design and construction of workbenches, tool chests, appliances and wall cabinets. Also, a discussion of all the important Western furniture styles, including their construction, mouldings and metal hardware. This section also includes the construction drawings for many important and famous pieces of furniture examined by Charles H. Hayward during his tenure at The Woodworker magazine.