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The Workshop at Marina 59

Paul planes down a polyurethane foam longboard blank — this is the first step in shaping a surfboard, and involves sanding it down to the ideal size and width.
The scene inside Paul’s studio.
Each board Paul makes is a piece of art, and he signs them all.
Paul’s tools-of-the-trade, including a saw for shaping and calipers for measuring dimensions.
Different resins get mixed, which are used to color the shaped boards.
Paul and Seth (a fellow surfer and Best Made’s Marketing Manager), lay the resin on the board, in a process called glassing.
The finishing touches of glassing the board.
When the top of the board is dry, Paul flips it to glass the other side.
The final stage: sanding, finishing, and polishing.
Paul’s workshop is in Marina 59, in the Rockaways. He shares studio space with other artists inside a bunch of repurposed shipping containers.
Heading towards the 60th street boardwalk, with the finished board in tow.
Paul heads out into the surf to put the day’s work to the test.
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June 2019

Photography by Mikey DeTemple

On a recent sunny Saturday, we headed out to the Rockaways in New York to meet up with Paul Schmidt at his workshop in Marina 59.
Paul has been shaping surfboards for a decade and launched his studio — Paul Surf — in 2014. Producing one board from start to finish
is a full day’s work, from planing to glassing to finishing. Paul completes every step himself, by hand, and usually has about ten boards
going at once, working in phases. Inspired by the precision of midcentury shapers, his life’s work is to share the joy of creating and riding
your own board — and to explore the connection between sport, ocean, and craft.